My Stuff

2010 Conferences

OSGi DevCon @ JAX London

February 23 - Keynote titled OSGi in the Enterprise: Agility, Modularity, and Architecture’s Paradox

EclipseCon

March 22 - 25 - Tutorial on Modular Architecture

Über Conf

June 14 - 17 - Sessions titled Turtles and Architecture and Patterns of Modular Architecture

Catalyst

July 26 - 30 - Two sessions on rich mobile applications and one on agile development. Half day tutorial on software process improvement.

Tweets @ Twitter

re: #apple event "We sold more iPads than any PC manufacturer sold of their entire PC line." 2012-09-12

re: #Apple Event ""Our notebooks now rank #1 in the US in Market share in the last three months." 2012-09-12

Right on. I just won a Best Buy drawing worth $1000. Either that or I won a shiny new virus by clicking the link. Hmm...what to do. 2012-08-29

The #osgi alliance response (http://t.co/KrN8XNWg) to the @mreinhold #jigsaw announcement (http://t.co/9YvcDdqC). 2012-08-29

Good Q&A with @mreinhold on project #jigsaw. http://t.co/9YvcDdqC. Modularity will change the way we design and run apps! 2012-08-28

LinkedIn Profile

The opinions expressed on this site are my own, and not necessarily those of my employer.

Back to the Future

Filed Under Architecture & Design, Java, OSGi, Platforms |  

Thanks

This is my last post of the year, and I want to take a moment to thank everyone that spends their precious time reading my long-winded entries. In 2009, I saw a four fold increase in blog traffic over 2008, and December 2009 saw a five fold increase in traffic over January 2009. Out of a total of 74 posts this year, more than half were related to modularity. I’d like to think the increase in traffic is related to the topics I’ve been writing about. Modularity is something that folks are interested in. But we still have a ways to go.

Future of Modularity

Interestingly, I was speaking to a conference organizer yesterday, and I sensed his mild surprise when I began to talk about modularity. He noted that modularity is certainly not a new concept. I agreed. It’s an idea that has been around since at least the early 1970’s when David Parnas published his essay. But things are different now. Until recently, modularity was not a first class concept on the Java platform. If we wanted to develop software with a modular architecture, we were required to do so without much framework or platform support. In fact, we hadn’t even identified any standard definition of module on the platform.

That’s changing. As the application platform vendors continue to bake OSGi into their products, it’s clear that a module is a JAR file and there’s a framework to back it up. In 2010 modularity on the Java platform will gain considerable visibility in our industry. The stackless stack is coming to fruition, and it’s a game changer…a disruptor…that reaches from the developer to the data center. It’s not something we should ignore. Really, it’s not something we can ignore anymore.  So, as we close out one decade and usher in another, modularity will celebrate at least its 40th birthday. Maybe we’re finally starting to get it.

All Posts Page

A final note before closing out 2009. For those interested, I’ve created a custom Wordpress page that shows a summary of all posts published on this blog. Enjoy!

Comments

2 Responses to “Back to the Future”

  1. dm Server project moves to Eclipse.org | SpringSource Team Blog on January 12th, 2010 11:10 am

    [...] here; if you’re writing infrastructure software and need to create a “stackless stack” (Kirk Knoerschild, James Governor) then OSGi is already the de-facto approach, and fully supported by the dm Server [...]

  2. OSGi - Feast or Famine? : Software & Technology @kirkk.com on April 12th, 2010 4:50 pm

    [...] I commented on a recent conversation I had with a conference organizer and his reluctance to accept my speaking proposal on modularity. [...]

Leave a Reply