My Stuff

2010 Conferences

OSGi DevCon @ JAX London

February 23 - Keynote titled OSGi in the Enterprise: Agility, Modularity, and Architecture’s Paradox

EclipseCon

March 22 - 25 - Tutorial on Modular Architecture

Über Conf

June 14 - 17 - Sessions titled Turtles and Architecture and Patterns of Modular Architecture

Catalyst

July 26 - 30 - Two sessions on rich mobile applications and one on agile development. Half day tutorial on software process improvement.

Tweets @ Twitter

re: #apple event "We sold more iPads than any PC manufacturer sold of their entire PC line." 2012-09-12

re: #Apple Event ""Our notebooks now rank #1 in the US in Market share in the last three months." 2012-09-12

Right on. I just won a Best Buy drawing worth $1000. Either that or I won a shiny new virus by clicking the link. Hmm...what to do. 2012-08-29

The #osgi alliance response (http://t.co/KrN8XNWg) to the @mreinhold #jigsaw announcement (http://t.co/9YvcDdqC). 2012-08-29

Good Q&A with @mreinhold on project #jigsaw. http://t.co/9YvcDdqC. Modularity will change the way we design and run apps! 2012-08-28

LinkedIn Profile

The opinions expressed on this site are my own, and not necessarily those of my employer.

Crap4J - Alarming EULA

Filed Under Agile, Development, Metrics | 4 Comments 

Updated (11/02/07) : Please note the responses from Alberto and Bob attached to this post. They’ve offered some assurance that Crap4J does not transmit any code to their servers, and that the licensing snafu was due to a simple oversight. They also resolve to correct the licensing agreements. Thank you, Alberto and Bob! : End Update

I went to install the Crap4J Eclipse plug-in. As part of this plug-in, there are four separate features, and I happened to actually read the license agreement for each of them. In a nutshell, for three of the features (Agitair JUnit Runner, Agitair JUnit4 Suport, and Public API for Generated Tests), the license agreement states that the software is experimental and primarily for academic, research, and open source use. But that’s not the alarming part. It also says that it transmits your code over the open internet to be analyzed on non-secure Agitair computers shared by multiple users. Here’s the exact text:

THIS SOFTWARE IS INTENDED PRIMARILY FOR ACADEMIC, RESEARCH, AND OPEN SOURCE
USE. WHILE COMMERCIAL USE IS ALLOWED, PLEASE BE AWARE THAT YOUR CODE
IS TRANSMITTED OVER THE OPEN INTERNET AND ANALYZED ON NON-SECURE
COMPUTERS SHARED BY MULTIPLE USERS.

I don’t like that much, and it seems a bit sneaky to hide that rather important note in a license agreement that I doubt many folks read. There should be a more noticeable disclaimer somewhere. Also, I found no such notice in the Ant Task distribution (in fact, couldn’t find a license agreement included at all). But that’s not saying the Ant Task does or does not transmit your code.
I don’t know the internal behavior of Crap4J. Maybe it doesn’t send your code anywhere. But the license agreement indicates that Crap4J does, or at the very least, that they have the right to do so. Maybe, giving them the benefit of the doubt, they didn’t fully review the license agreement, and aren’t aware of what it says. Either way, the fact that this important note is buried within a license agreement without any other public disclaimer is very alarming and deceiving.